Holocaust education week begins in Florida schools

Holocaust education week began Tuesday across the state of Florida, as schools teach about the horrors inflicted by the Nazis.“It’s our obligation to pass on this story so that we do never forget,” said Kimberly Coombs, Holocaust education program director in Palm Beach County. “And so we can hopefully prevent anything like that from ever happening again.”The week began on the anniversary of Kristallnacht, what’s considered the unofficial beginning of the Holocaust.“We have always understood the importance of making sure that our students are aware of one of the darkest times in the world’s history,” Coombs said.In 2019, Florida’s Legislature mandated Holocaust education in the schools.Coombs said in Palm Beach County, the programs focus on not just what happened during the war, but before and after the war, as well.“We teach the students about the strength and the resilience of the Jewish people and their fight for survival,” she said.The lessons in the county seem move relevant recently after a district principal, William Latson, was fired for telling a parent he could not say the Holocaust was a factual event.Latson was later reinstated but was fired again by the school board on Tuesday.Latson’s story was picked up around the globe with many people believing Palm Beach County was faulty in its Holocaust education.Coombs said that couldn’t be further from the truth.“We’ve been teaching Holocaust studies in the district of Palm Beach County consistently for 16 years,” she said.She said the lessons in the county don’t only happen for this one week.She said Holocaust education is in most high schools and many middle schools.During this specific week, the education comes not only from books but from movies and exhibits from the Holocaust Museum.Many students will hear from Holocaust survivors, those who lived through it and want to ensure that we never forget.“We want to make sure this story gets passed on before we don’t have survivors left living anymore,” Coombs said.

Holocaust education week began Tuesday across the state of Florida, as schools teach about the horrors inflicted by the Nazis.

“It’s our obligation to pass on this story so that we do never forget,” said Kimberly Coombs, Holocaust education program director in Palm Beach County. “And so we can hopefully prevent anything like that from ever happening again.”

The week began on the anniversary of Kristallnacht, what’s considered the unofficial beginning of the Holocaust.

“We have always understood the importance of making sure that our students are aware of one of the darkest times in the world’s history,” Coombs said.

In 2019, Florida’s Legislature mandated Holocaust education in the schools.

Coombs said in Palm Beach County, the programs focus on not just what happened during the war, but before and after the war, as well.

“We teach the students about the strength and the resilience of the Jewish people and their fight for survival,” she said.

The lessons in the county seem move relevant recently after a district principal, William Latson, was fired for telling a parent he could not say the Holocaust was a factual event.

Latson was later reinstated but was fired again by the school board on Tuesday.

Latson’s story was picked up around the globe with many people believing Palm Beach County was faulty in its Holocaust education.

Coombs said that couldn’t be further from the truth.

“We’ve been teaching Holocaust studies in the district of Palm Beach County consistently for 16 years,” she said.

She said the lessons in the county don’t only happen for this one week.

She said Holocaust education is in most high schools and many middle schools.

During this specific week, the education comes not only from books but from movies and exhibits from the Holocaust Museum.

Many students will hear from Holocaust survivors, those who lived through it and want to ensure that we never forget.

“We want to make sure this story gets passed on before we don’t have survivors left living anymore,” Coombs said.

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