Month: November 2020

The Latest: Cambodia shuts schools after rare outbreak

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia — Cambodia’s Education Ministry has ordered all state schools to close until the start of the next school year in January after a rare local outbreak of the coronavirus.

Education Minister Hang Chuon Naron issued a statement late Sunday saying that all schools will be shut to prevent students from being infected. Public schools will remain closed until until Jan. 11, the start of the next school year, while private schools must close for two weeks, he said.

Students in private schools will be permitted to study online.

Cambodian officials said over the weekend that a family

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COVID Collaborative Launches Vaccine Education Campaign | News

The COVID Collaborative — a coalition of experts in health, education, and the economy — launched a $50 million vaccine education campaign with nonprofit advertising group the Ad Council on Nov. 23. The effort aims to inform Americans about COVID-19 vaccines and their benefits.

Harvard School of Public Health Dean Michelle A. Williams co-founded the Collaborative alongside former Domestic Policy Council and USA Freedom Corps director John M. Bridgeland ’82 and current World Health Organization Ambassador for Global Strategy Roy G. Chambers. Chambers is a member of the School of Public Health Communication Advisory Board.

Several other Harvard faculty members

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Five ways Joe Biden can “de-DeVos” U.S. education

Teachers and other education advocates are feeling giddy at the possibility of moving forward a progressive agenda that the current education secretary, Betsy DeVos, stopped dead in its tracks four years ago. President-elect Joe Biden campaign’s policy director, Stef Feldman, told the Education Writers Association that as president, Biden would “get some big, bold education legislation passed and certainly immediate relief for our schools and our educators,” and said Biden would take executive actions as well. Many of those executive actions, education advocates hope, will de-DeVos the Department of Education.

Here are some of the likeliest ways public education will

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St. Coletta of Greater Washington’s CEO to retire after a 30-year career helping the disabled

Sharon Raimo started with a special education class 27 years ago. She transformed that class into St. Coletta of Greater Washington, an organization that serves over 900 developmentally disabled adults and children.

Sharon Raimo, a special education teacher, hired in 1993 to teach a class of 19 intellectually disabled students, managed for over 28 years to transform that classroom in an Arlington Catholic church basement into St. Coletta of Greater Washington — a nonsectarian, nonprofit agency serving intellectually disabled children and adults in D.C., northern Virginia and suburban Maryland.

Now, Raimo says she is retiring, effective Jan. 4.

She’s followed

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We need a college leader as secretary of education

Of the last six U.S. secretaries of education, three rose up from K-12 systems, and three had little or no background in education. The last higher education leader in the role was Lamar AlexanderAndrew (Lamar) Lamar AlexanderAs Biden administration ramps up, Trump legal effort drags on The Hill’s 12:30 Report: Trump holds his last turkey pardon ceremony The Hill’s Morning Report – Presented by the UAE Embassy in Washington, DC – Trump OKs transition; Biden taps Treasury, State experience MORE, former president of the University of Tennessee, whom George H.W. Bush appointed in the early 1990s.  

President-elect Biden

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